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Why We Need to Save Engine 95...
 

Why we need to save Engine 95...

 

  • The City of Daly City is the largest city in San Mateo County with well over 100,000 people living here.

 

  • The Daly City Fire Department responds to thousands of emergency calls every year with only 18 firefighters on duty each day.

 

  • Daly City has some of the busiest fire engines on the peninsula and cannot afford to lose any equipment or personnel.

 

  • 2015 was our busiest year to date and the loss of a fire engine will only further strain a fire department that is already providing  emergency services to a large city with limited staffing.

 

  • Your firefighters respond to any and all emergent and non-emergent incidents including  fires, medical aids, cliff rescues, auto accidents, natural disasters, hazardous material incidents and more!

 

 

The following is information relative to the proposed fire engine closure by Daly City Management.  The Daly City Firefighters Local 1879 members offer this information to the citizens of Daly City in order to provide a better understanding of the current level of fire protection in your community and the negative impact the proposed engine closure will have on your Fire Department and the essential service we provide:

 

Fire will spread quickly in your home!

Response times matter.  See how newer homes burn faster.

Click on the video below to see how a fire will spread in your home:

 

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IAFF GIS Study of the DCFD Response Capabilities

GIS Cover

On behalf of the Daly City Firefighters Local 1878, The International Association of Fire Fighters recently performed a comprehensive analysis of the Daly City Fire Department response capabilities.  Their analysis thoroughly illustrates the current response capabilities of the Daly City Fire Department and the impact an engine closure would have on those response capabilities.  Below are some highlights from their analysis.

 

2 -In, 2-Out

The following figure depicts the number of firefighters required to meet OSHA Regulation 1910.134, which demands one firefighter outside for every firefighter inside. The firefighters outside can support a secondary attack line and facilitate the rescue of trapped or disabled firefighters should the need arise. In this scenario, the driver/operator of the apparatus is not counted towards the total number of firefighters. 

2in, 2out

DCFD staffs the fire engines with only THREE firefighters; therefore, the "2-in, 2-out" regulation CANNOT be met until a second fire apparatus arrives on scene and firefighting activities are limited until that second apparatus arrives.

 

Full Alarm Assignment 

This is the initial response standard for a typical house fire.  Initial Full Alarm Assignment Capability, as outlined in NFPA Standard 1710, recommends that the "fire department shall have the capability to deploy an initial full alarm assignment within a 480-second travel time to 90 percent of the incidents... [and that the] initial full alarm shall provide for the following:

Assignment

Required Personnel

Incident Command 1 Officer
Uninterrupted Water Supply  1 Pump Operator
Water Flow from Two Handlines 4 Firefighters (2 for each line)
Support for Handlines 2 Firefighters (1 for each line)
Victim Search and Rescue Team   2 Firefighters
Ventilation Team  2 Firefighters
Aerial Operator  1 Firefighters

Initial Rapid Intervention Crew (IRIC)

 2 Firefighters

Required Minimum Personnel for Full Alarm 

14 Firefighters & 1 Scene Commander

NFPA 1710, §5.2.4.1.1. This breakdown of the expected capabilities of a full alarm assignment, in compliance with NFPA 1710, requires a minimum contingent of 15 fire suppression personnel. NFPA 1710 also requires that supervisory chief officers shall be assisted by a staff aide which will increase onscene staffing to 16 personnel required to arrive at the scene of a structure fire within 8 minutes of travel.  Although not specifically discussed in the standard, an industry best practice is to have a second uninterrupted water supply which requires a second dedicated engine pump operator. This second, dedicated pump operator brings the total count of firefighters to 17.

 

Current DCFD Response Capabilities

4-Minute Response Capabilities, Current Fire Companies. The map below identifies those roads where DCFD's apparatus can reach within 4 minutes of travel from the current fire stations. Currently, the Department is capable of responding on 56.3% of City roads within 4 minutes.  However, with only 3 personnel on each apparatus, the response capabilities depicted here DO NOT represent response areas where  the "2-in, 2-out" regulation can be achieved within 4 minutes.

Current DCFD Response

 

Current DCFD "2-In, 2-Out" Response Capabilities

Emergency "2 In/2 Out" Operations, 4-Minute Response Capabilities, Current Fire Companies.  The map below identifies those roads where a minimum of four firefighters can assemble on scene within 4 minutes. Currently, the Department is able to assemble 4 firefighters on scene within 4 minutes of travel on 11.6% of City roads.

Current DCFD 2in, 2out Response

 

Current DCFD Full Alarm Response Capabilities

NFPA 1710 Low-Hazard Initial Full Alarm (typical house fire) Response Capabilities, Minimum of 15 Firefighters within 8 Minutes, Current Companies.  The map below identifies those roads where a minimum of 15 firefighters can assemble within 8 minutes of travel from the current fire stations. Currently, the Department is capable of assembling a minimum of 15 firefighters within 8 minutes on 14.8% of City roads.

Current DCFD FUll Alarm Response

 

DCFD "2-In, 2-Out" Response Capabilities with Engine 95 Closed

Emergency "2 In/2 Out" Operations 4-Minute Response Capabilities, Engine 95 Closed. The map below identifies those roads where a minimum of four firefighters can assemble on scene within 4 minutes if Engine 95 is closed. Based on the proposed staffing and deployment configuration, the Department would be able to assemble 4 firefighters within 4 minutes of travel on 1.4% of City roads, which equates to an 88.3% decrease in coverage compared to the Department's current response capabilities.

DCFD 2in, 2out Response with E95 Closed

 

DCFD Full Alarm Response Capabilities with Engine 95 Closed

NFPA 1710 Low-Hazard Initial Full Alarm (typical house fire), Engine 95 Closed.  The map below identifies those roads where a minimum of 15 firefighters can assemble within 8 minutes of travel if Engine 95 is closed. Based on the proposed staffing and deployment configuration, the Department would be UNABLE to assemble a minimum of 15 firefighters on scene within 8 minutes on ANY roads within DCFD's response boundary.  

DCFD Full Alarm Response with E95 Closed

 

Response Concentration for 2015

Concentration of Emergency Response Incidents in Daly City. The map below depicts the concentration levels of emergency incidents that occurred in 2015. The highest concentration of incidents took place near Fire Stations 92 and 95. Additional resources should be positioned at fire stations that experience a high concentration of incidents to ensure safe and effective fire suppression and EMS response.

2015 Response Concentration

 

The preceding excerpts were small samples taken from the findings within the IAFF analysis.  The full document is a MUST READ for any Daly City resident that cares about the public safety services within their city.  You can view the entire document by clicking the link below.

http://www.dalycityfirefighters.org/items/Daly_City_L1879_GIS_Report_FINAL.pdf

 

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National Fire Protection Association Study

The following are key findings regarding national and regional fire department staffing levels and fire apparatus coverage, Taken from a recent NFPA STUDY ON U.S. FIRE DEPARTMENTS.  We are sharing this information as a reference, to compare against the current level of staffing and apparatus coverage within Daly City and to demonstrate the impact a fire engine closure will have on the fire protection in your community.

Report: NFPA's "U.S. Fire Department Profile"
Author: Hylton J. G. Haynes and Gary P. Stein
Issued: January 2016

The report includes statistics through 2014 on the numbers and characteristics of U.S. fire departments and firefighters. It also includes information on the number of fire stations, pumpers and ladders nationwide, rates of usage of such equipment by community size, and total national direct expenditures on local fire protection.  State and federal firefighting entities are not included. 

 

See Table below for key findings from the study as compared to Daly City:

NFPA Study

Current Daly City Figures

Proposed Daly City Figures

(after Engine closure)

  • Number of Career Firefighters² per 1000 people Nationally

                  1.67¹

  • Number of Career (non-volunteer) Firefighters² per 1000 people for all Career (non-volunteer) Fire Departments serving communities of similar size (pop. 100,000-249,999) and similar work schedule (52-60 hr. work week.)

                 1.34¹

  • Median number of Career Firefighters² per 1000 people serving communities of similar size (pop. 100,000-249,999)

                1.28¹

  • Number of Career Firefighters² per 1000 people in the Western Region (as defined by the U.S. Bureau of the Census) of the United States serving communities of similar size (pop. 100,000-249,999)

                0.99¹

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Firefighters² per 1000 people serving the citizens of Daly City³

                  0.61

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Firefighters² per 1000 people serving the citizens of Daly City³

                 0.53

 

Number of Fire Engines (pumpers) per 1000 people serving communities of similar size (pop. 100,000-249,999)

                0.067

Number of Fire Engines (Pumpers) per 1000 people serving the citizens of Daly City³      

                0.047

Number of Fire Engines (Pumpers) per 1000 people serving the citizens of Daly City³

                  0.038

Number of Aerial Apparatus (Ladder Trucks) per 1000 people serving communities of similar size (pop. 100,000-249,999)

                 0.014

Number of Aerial Apparatus (Ladder Trucks) per 1000 people serving the Citizens of Daly City

               0.00674

Number of Aerial Apparatus (Ladder Trucks) per 1000 people serving the Citizens of Daly City

              0.00674

Number of Fire Stations per 1000 people serving communities of similar size (pop. 100,000-249,999)

                     0.070

Number of Fire Stations per 1000 people serving the Citizens of Daly City³

                 0.0485

Number of Fire Stations per 1000 people serving the Citizens of Daly City³

                   0.0485

  1. Result from the NFPA study were calculated using Fire Departments staffed with all Career Firefighters and mostly Career Firefighters.  Daly City Fire is staffed with ALL Career Firefighters.  Departments with mostly Career firefighters may also have volunteer firefighters to supplement their staffing, which were NOT reflected into these figures
  2. Per the NFPA study, "Career Firefighters" include full-time, uniformed firefighters regardless of assignments, e.g., suppression, prevention/inspection, administrative.  The number of firefighters available in Daly City was calculated using the same criteria; however, the number of firefighters that actually respond on a Fire Engine or Ladder Truck is actually 14% less than the number used to calculate the above results for Daly City.
  3. Daly City population was based on the July 1, 2014 U.S. Census Bureau population estimate of 106,094.
  4. Figures for Aerial Apparatus were calculated using the combined total population for the cities of Brisbane, Pacifica and Daly City, based on the July 1, 2014 U.S. Census Bureau population estimates.  The Daly City Aerial Apparatus is the primary provider of Aerial Apparatus service to all three jurisdictions.  Although the resulting figure for Aerial Apparatus does not change with the closure of a Fire Engine, the level of service it can provide will be negatively impacted as it will continue to respond to calls that require specialized Ladder Truck/Rescue operations in addition to all the calls that were once handled by the closed Engine.  The availability of the Aerial to respond to ladder truck/rescue operations will be significantly diminished, just as the availability of the Aerial to respond to the calls previously handled by the closed Engine will be much lower than the availability of that Engine.  Additionally, the size, weight and maneuverability of an Aerial Apparatus compared to a smaller, lighter, more maneuverable Engine will further increase response times to the incidents previously handled by an Engine.
  5. Although this unusually low figure isn't further impacted by an Engine closure, the level of service your Fire Stations are able to provide is negatively impacted as the staffing and apparatus availability will be significantly diminished.

 

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The table below depicts the per capita cost for fire protection within every jurisdiction in San Mateo County. The current per capita cost for fire protection in Daly City is already extremely low for a full-time, career fire department in a city of 100,000+ population.  The proposed budget cuts leave insufficient resources to provide for an adequate level of fire protection to a city our size.

 

Per Capita Cost

 

 
 
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